High on a fence

Filed in Photo of the Day

From time to time, I manage to take one or two nice photographs (subjectively speaking of course). I'm currently using a Canon IXUS 400 but may soon have a new Canon EOS 350D to play with. Combined with the Canon SRL lenses that I already own, it should enable me to take more appeasing and attractive photographs. The problems with the IXUS 400 are the limitations of the lens, the non-sharpness of the images and the delay between pressing the button and actually taking the picture. All of these problems will be pretty much eliminated by the 350D.

In the meantime, here are two pictures that I took today in an area called Causeway Bay. Click on the images to view them at a larger size.

Two guys painting a fence

Painting a fence

A running update

Filed in LifeTags:

One of my friends asked me how I was getting on with my barefoot running. I had to tell him about the cramps on my last run and how it turned out that they weren't cramps at all. The pain was actually an injury which you could say was caused by not wearing shoes. Does that mean that I'll go back to wearing shoes? No and here's why.

The injury was in the calves of my feet. I say "injury" and "calves" because both calves were injured but the left calf is the one with the serious injury while the right calf has already recovered. The injury was in fact a type of tearing; tearing at the point where the tendons from the base of the ankle connect to the muscle. The calves will need four to six weeks for full recovery. In the meantime, I have to stretch them regularly every day.

What caused the injury? Without shoes, there are no heels to lift my ankles off the ground. Without the heels, the angle between my shins and my feet becomes smaller. On flat ground, this doesn't pose much of a problem but the territory around my home is hilly and that poses a very serious problem. When running up a slope, the angle between the shin and the foot becomes extremely small. This in turn stretches the calf muscle to a length it's not used to. With the repeated bouncing of running, the calf muscle's tendon will eventually begin to tear away from the muscle.

There is one section of my short run where the road begins to slope upward rather steeply. It's a very short stretch but seemingly enough to cause the damage that I've experienced. If I had stretched diligently before each run and nightly before sleeping, the injury would not have occurred because the muscle would have been long enough to accept the full stretch.

Ankle angle flat

The angle at the ankle without shoes on flat ground.

Ankle angle shoe

With shoes, the heel is raised and the angle at the ankle is larger. The calf muscle is slightly shorter.

Ankle angle uphill

When facing uphill, the angle at the ankle is much smaller. If actually running, the leg would be leaning forward at the end of the stride, further reducing the ankle angle and further stretching the calf muscle.

So what now? Well I'll rest for another three or four weeks, stretching every day and then begin the running again. If you never get back on the bicycle after falling off, you'll never learn to ride. My calf injuries are just a learning step in the process of becoming a barefoot runner. I'll be back on the road again soon, although I may have to face the prospect of blisters again.

I promised an article about coffee. I'll deliver it soon. I promise.

A better look for my blog

Filed in Technology

A few days ago, I began looking at the way my blog was styled and considered methods of improving it or at least making it look nicer. I'm a perfectionist in many ways so placing style information within the actual web page was not the way to go. Instead, I used style sheets (technically known as Cascading Style Sheets or CSS for short). They're similar to the way text styles work in word processors. They were developed by the World Wide Web consortium as a way to simplify and centralise the visual design of web pages but took a very long time to be fully embraced by the web community at large. These days, we're looking at version three of the CSS standard and other than Internet Explorer, almost every browser is on board to fully support the standard soon.

I'm not going to bore you with the techie details because they are boring for all but the people actually using CSS to make their web sites more attractive, functional and manageable.

Anyway, after three nights of customising the layouts and style sheets, my blog's pages are fully scalable. So if you think the text is too small to read, simply enlarge it using your web browser's Bigger Text function and the whole page will scale appropriately; even the left and right columns. If you need really big text, I'd suggest getting a 17" monitor and enlarging the page to the full size of the screen. I tried it, and it works great.

Other improvements: Pictures within the stories will scale down if you narrow the middle column, and they now have a nice black border for better definition. The calendar in the left column now indicates dates with linked stories much more effectively.

And in case I forget, there's also the new Subscribe to email notification feature in the right column. If you'd like to be notified every time I post a new article, type your email address into the field and click the Subscribe button. RSS news feeds still work too if you'd prefer to use RSS.

I'm definitely not a web expert, so if you find any glitches in my blog regarding the placement and size of the text or pictures, please let me know.

As advanced as CSS is, there are still a few aspects of it which are quite mind-numbing. How properties 'cascade' is a little complex in some situations, and creating a scalable page using relative em values was not easy either. The technology still has a way to go before it's really mature, and we're still waiting for wysiwyg web page layout applications which fully support CSS rather than tables and in-tag style properties. On the other hand, if you write the code for your web page with sound structure, then laying it out and adding appearance properties to it becomes relatively easy; once you fully understand how CSS works.

I won't talk much about web technologies. I suspect that for the majority of my readers (Douglas excepted of course), web technologies would be very boring to read about.

My next article will be more to the liking of most of my readers: ie, coffee!

Fog, fog and more fog

Filed in General, Hong Kong

The last time I wrote about the weather here was back before the Chinese New Year when it was foggy and wet. Guess what? It's still foggy and wet. In the last eight weeks or more, we've only seen six or seven days of warm weather with sunshine. Otherwise, it's been foggy and wet. The only difference now is that the temperature is on the way up with average temperatures of mid-twenties (that's celsius for those of you in fahrenheit countries). By summer time, the temperature will be up in the high twenties and sometimes near the mid-thirties. It can get very warm here.

Living in the fog, the humidity is very high. The tile floors inside the apartment and outside the back door are still creating water without any help from us or the dogs. It makes it very difficult to keep the apartment clean when the floors are constantly wet or at least moist.

I've lived in Hong Kong for the last 18 years, and I've lived in our current area for five years. This foggy weather is very unusual. We normally get foggy weather each year, but it's normally in March and only lasts for three or four weeks. It even has a name. It's called "Return of the Southerly Winds" or 回南 as it's known locally. With this big change in weather this year, I believe we can look forward to some really strong and powerful hurricanes in early and late Summer. We had a couple last year but I haven't really seen anything really strong since 1985 when I visited Hong Kong the first time for just a week with a fellow student from the University of New South Wales.

You have to remember that I come from Queensland, Australia where they have real hurricanes except that they're known as cyclones there because they rotate in the opposite direction. At least that's what my friend says. I remember that we had cyclones in Queensland when I was growing up, but I also seem to remember having hurricanes. I always thought that hurricanes were larger in diameter than cyclones. I guess I was wrong. If my father reads this, I'm sure he can enlighten us all.

Which brings me to another small detail that came up as a consequence at lunch the other day. Supposedly, water while flushing down the toilet rotates or swirls in opposite directions in Australia and Hong Kong because they're on opposite sides of the equator. I believe it but I've never actually made the effort to compare the directions for myself. Maybe I'll check the next time I go back to Australia.

And that brings me to Annie's song: "Oh, the sun'll come up, tomorrow. Bet your bottom dollar that tomorrow, there'll be sun." I hope so; soon at least.

A busy week

Filed in Perfume 香水 (2005), TVB (H.K.) 香港無線電視, WorkTags:

前晚可以看到 嘅 演唱會真開心。聽他唱就聽得出他很有心唱,很懷念哥哥。GREAT show!恭喜 Leo。

Instagram image

salutetoleslie

A busy week

Filed in Perfume 香水 (2005), TVB (H.K.) 香港無線電視, WorkTags:

It was a busy week. I have been filming a television series 「隨時候命」 about the Hong Kong Government Flying Service (GFS) 政府飛行服務隊 and we actually get to sit in real helicopters like the one shown here. Even though I'm a senior pilot in the series, I don't actually get to fly. We filmed the flying scenes inside the GFS hangar using green backdrops for what we in the industry call chroma-key where they'll later replace the green background with actual sky. GFS's helicopters are incredibly nice pieces of engineering. The technology and materials used to build those copters is awe-inspiring.

(An interesting thing about the chroma-key: all of us with GFS roles have authentic GFS sweaters but we've never been able to wear them no matter how cold the weather became. Why? Because the sweaters are green!)

On location: An HKGFS helicopter pilot in TVB's 「隨時候命」

I spent two days at the GFS hangar this week, and two nights in the television studio filming the GFS offices. I spent another night on location out in a town called Tin Sui Wai filming for another television series called "Into thin air" 「人間蒸發」. That shoot didn't finish until 4am.

And finally, there was one night rehearsing for our new stage play "Perfume" 「香水」. With only twenty-something days remaining, we don't have a lot of time to perfect our performances but I think it'll be pretty good anyway.

The coming week should be slower. I'll be able to spend more time on the piano, improving my music abilities.

Whose dog barks louder?

Filed in Dogs of our Lives

Our little village has gone to the dogs; literally. Our up-door neighbours moved out several months ago because they couldn't handle being surrounded by dogs. Our own dogs bark but thankfully not incessantly but there are plenty of other dogs to make up for the silence.

The view from our village

In clock-face terminology, try to imagine this arrangement.

At 2 o'clock, a new neighbour has moved in and surprised us by laying claim to having not 3, not 5 but 13 dogs. Only four of them reside on the roof where we can see them. The other nine reside within their third-floor apartment. Three of the roof-residing dogs bark occasionally and who can blame them? Life on a walled-in roof can be pretty dull.

At 3 o'clock, our neighbour owns four or five dogs. We almost never hear them bark because the windows are almost always closed shut.

At 4 o'clock behind the 3 o'clock building is another building whose ground floor occupier owns four beautiful and extremely human-looking Afghan hounds. They spend much of their time standing on their hind legs leaning on the brick wall and watching the people and other dogs pass by below. They of course bark every time a dog goes past, and occasionally when people go past.

At 5 o'clock on the second floor, there are two small dogs. On the roof belonging to another person are another three, possibly four dogs. I'm not exactly sure how many because we've never seen them, just heard them fight and bark on occasion.

At 7 o'clock just behind us, there are another two or three dogs. They're pretty bored inside so they spend some of their time looking out the window and barking at us whenever we pass by. The alley-way between their building and ours makes an excellent amplifier so their barking is sometimes the loudest and one of the main reasons that our up-door neighbours moved away.

At 9 o'clock on the second floor is another dog. He spends almost all of his time on the balcony. He's not really allowed inside the apartment. As a result, he's the watchdog for our little row of buildings, barking at each and every man, woman and dog that passes by the back of our building. Our own dogs respond in kind to each of his alarm signals by barking and running outside. I wish I knew dog-talk because our dogs instantly know by his language whether the passer-by is a human, a dog, a monkey or a man pulling a small trolley and yelling at the top of his voice "buying old television sets, buying old air conditioners" (always in Cantonese of course; 收買電視機,收買冷氣機).

At 12 o'clock on the other side of a forest area are more dogs.

And in our home, there are ten dogs. They're wonderful members of the family and we love them all. Thankfully, they're not as noisy as they could have been and generally keep pretty quiet. The things that really rile them up to a full barking frenzy (and frenzy is exactly the right word to use here) are people walking their dogs past our gate (ie, an intrusion on their territory) and monkeys.

Some of our dogs watching the neighbours

But back to the question; whose dog barks louder? I would have to say that our dogs bark the loudest but it's not really a question of decibels as much as a question of responsibility. When other dogs bark, it's not my responsibility and I don't have to worry about them or the noise they're making. When our dogs bark, at some point I have a responsibility to quiet them down. There's a psychology angle to all of this and it has to do with the pressure of being a responsible neighbour. Consequently, our dogs bark the loudest, especially if they're barking at 8 or 9 in the morning when some neighbours might still be sleeping.

Thankfully though, our ten wonderful dogs are relatively quiet; except when the monkeys comes visiting but I'll tell you about them another time.

There is no random

Filed in General

There is no such thing as random. Rather, random is an ordered order, the order of which is beyond our comprehension.

Within the world, everything is the direct consequence of another action and this is true down to the very smallest of the physical and atomic and sub-atomic world. We think things happen randomly because we can't explain them. We use probability to calculate the chances that an outcome will occur but the outcome will in fact be a sure thing if we understand all of the factors involved.

Do people have free will? On the surface, yes. In reality, no. People are chemical and electrical machines. Our feelings are the results of the environment in which we live, combined with the chemical makeup of our bodies. Our thoughts are electrical and everything within our minds is a result of what we've seen or heard. We appear to have free will because we appear to have a choice. In reality, the choice was made before it was shown to us and our decision was never really a free decision.

In science fiction (and non-fiction) circles, people talk about parallel universes. The concept of parallel universes is based on the concept of random outcomes, that even every microscopic movement of air can lead to countless random outcomes. Consequently, all of those outcomes are actually occurring, all at the same time but in different zones of the 'space time continuum'. If random is a fallacy, then so is the notion of parallel universes.

Unfortunately, if random is a fallacy, then so is choice and decision. For many people, that would be the equivalent of fateism and that would in turn lead to apathy. In todays world, that wouldn't be a good thing so it's probably better that most people don't understand the truth about random.